Benchmarking: Worth it?

There are many differences that should to be taken into consideration when choosing whether to set up your test as a qualitative or quantitative study. Qualitative testing yields results that can answer questions related to “why is this happening?” Or “how did that interaction make you feel?”. Where the main goal of performing a quantitative usability test is to gain some metrics, whether it be the success of a certain task, or time taken to complete a task, to name only a few.… Continue Reading »

Ethics in Usability Research: Invasive Tracking

Shadowing, monitoring, and recording of users has become increasingly sophisticated. As these services become more robust, providing increasingly granular and specific information, they can raise the risk level for users. They tout many advantages for researchers but their activities are often non-consensual with respect to users. The user is unaware of their depth or just how much they are divulging while simply browsing.… Continue Reading »

A Snapshot of Entire Product—User Story Mapping

I learned the user story mapping when I worked as a product design intern at a startup company. They used this method to build their products. I think it is really a powerful technique that helps to organize what functionalities we need to build for users and also serves a good communication between team members. For this article, I’m going to briefly introduce the user story mapping and to demonstrate how to do user story mapping by taking the project I’m doing right now for Pratt Institute Libraries as an example.… Continue Reading »

Avoid misleading by quantitative responses on questionnaire: Traps in usability evaluation and the solutions

Introduction

Quantitative Usability was considered as a statistic way to evaluate system and service efficiency and usability. However, it’s easy to mislead by the quantitative feedback, like Darrell Huff’s “How to lie with statistics”(Huff, 2010), without validity benchmarks, quantitative usability methods are delicate and useless. I introduce both advantages and drawbacks in this article, emphasize the bias of quantitative usability data, and give the solution.Continue Reading »

It’s Written All Over Your Face! Or Is it? – Facial Response Analysis

Facial response analysis of the Mona Lisa

Facial Response Analysis has provided companies and researchers with a unique look into how exactly their users are feeling, allowing them to gather a large amount of data and provide a better user experience. However, this method may not always pick up on specific or unique emotional expressions, causing inaccuracy amongst evaluation.

 

     One element of great user experience design is a product that ignites positive emotions and engagement.Continue Reading »