Simulating Color Blindness for a More Accessible Interface

Choosing a good color scheme that follows best practices in design theory is a very important factor when creating a digital interface. It’s also important to design in ways that allow as many people as possible to access a product by taking into account the differing ways in which people perceive color.

What is color blindness?Continue Reading »

Visual Lies: Usability in Deceptive Data Visualizations

Designers can utilize usability principles to create products that may greatly enhance our everyday lives. From smart phone apps to non-Norman Doors, the application of usability principles has given us wonderful tools, games, and digital interfaces. But what about the dark, deceptive uses of these principles?

In a previous post, I explored ways in which online notices for terms and conditions are often designed in ways to be deceptive to internet users (that post can be found by clicking here).… Continue Reading »

Asking Why: An Interview with Natalie Blair

Natalie Blair

I recently had the opportunity to interview Natalie Blair. Although Natalie and I are acquainted through our mutual love of roller derby, I wanted to pick her brain on her experience transitioning into the field of UX and to see if she had any pieces of advice for someone hoping to do the same. Natalie works as a UX Designer/Producer in New York at Tigerspike, a mobile technology company, and is an “enthusiastic champion of the ‘why?’” Recently, she wrote an article on UX for Medium.com that touches on many of the subjects brought up during this interview titled, “What Designers Can Learn From the Stage or — How to Upstage your Content and Annoy Your User.”

Erin: So you are a UX Designer/Producer at Tigerspike, could you briefly discuss the work you do there, your role and responsibilities?Continue Reading »

Qualitative or Quantitative: When do you ask your users and when your data?

Designing information experiences takes into consideration perception (engaging with the senses), cognition (engaging with the mind), emotion (engaging with the heart), and action (engaging with the body). Other factors such as capabilities, constraints, and context also influence experience, and the process of examining these details involves a great deal of research and evaluation both initially and continually as products are tested and improved.Continue Reading »