Summer 2016 Course: Projects in Information Experience Design

Photo courtesy of Tudor Hulubei, http://hulubei.net

Photo courtesy of Tudor Hulubei, http://hulubei.net

This summer I’ll be teaching a course called “Projects in Information Experience Design” as part of the UX Advanced Certificate program but open to all School of Information students. In this course, students will work with the Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum to help them understand and improve the visitor experience.

Throughout the course-long project, students will employ a range of design research methods to identify a specific issue with the digital and/or physical museum experience and iteratively design a feasible solution, which will then be presented directly to museum staff for their feedback and approval.

As an advanced course, it supplements and extends concepts from LIS-643 (Information Architecture & Interaction Design) and LIS-644 (Usability Theory & Practice) by teaching students how to work with information organizations to conceptualize and implement user-centered information tools, services, and spaces. Topics will include design thinking, discovery research, service design, and project planning and implementation, with an emphasis on designing “information experiences” that meet the needs of both internal and external stakeholders.

The full course description and syllabus is available on my website at http://www.craigmacdonald.com/lis-682-projects-in-info-exp-design/.

What: Projects in Information Experience Design (LIS-682)
When: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5/23-6/21, 4:00-8:20p
Where: Room 609
Pre-requisites: LIS-643 or LIS-644 (or with permission of the instructor)

NOTE: The course will involve occasional off-site visits to the Intrepid Museum (located at Pier 86 on the West Side), both during and outside of scheduled class times.

If you have any questions about this course, please contact me.

Designing a Better Information Experience for the Asia Society Museum

In Spring 2015, a team of students from my Projects in Information Experience Design course (LIS 682) at Pratt Institute planned and implemented a semester-long research and design project aimed at helping the Asia Society Museum better engage with college-aged adults. Course projects covered three broad areas: Communication, Engagement, and Interactivity.

Project activities included stakeholder interviews with museum staff, surveys with nearly 100 college-aged adults, literature reviews, subject matter expert interviews, on-site observations, and comparative visitor experience reviews.

Communication

ixdcommunicationThe Communication team presented a proposal for the Asia Society Museum to bring in more visitors to the museum by appealing to different motivations through their social media accounts. They also proposed an evaluation method and workflow to assess the efficacy of these new outreach and communication methods.

Student Team: Carlos Acevedo, Marlee Walters, Andrew Wong-Crocitto

Group deliverables are available upon request. Please contact Professor MacDonald for details.

Engagement

ixdengagementThe Engagement team presented a proposal to re-conceptualize the lobby of the Asia Society Museum as a “transitional space” that (a) helps visitors transition from the outside environment; (b) sets the stage for the visitor; (c) prepares the visitor for navigating and experiencing the museum; and (d) evokes an emotional connection by creating a calm, tranquil environment, with a warm, welcoming vibe.

Student Team: Bowon Chung, Jacob Laurenti, Diana Sapanaro

Group deliverables are available upon request. Please contact Professor MacDonald for details.

Interactivity

ixdinteractivityThe Interactivity team presented a proposal for a re-designed interface for the Asia Society Museum’s interactive kiosk. The kiosk was designed to be (a) unobtrusive and non-distracting: it doesn’t pull visitors away from the exhibit, but rather enriches the museum’s content; and (b) intuitive, user-friendly, and content-driven: the navigation is streamlined, the content is clearly labeled, and the interface utilizes design principles to enhance the overall mood and theme of the museum environment.

Student Team: Rachel Bronstein, Hannah Goldstein, Meredith Powers

Group deliverables are available upon request. Please contact Professor MacDonald for details.

Columbia GovDocs Usability Study

columbiagovdocsIn Spring 2015, a team of students from my Usability Theory & Practice course (LIS 644) at Pratt Institute conducted a usability study of the website for Columbia University Libraries’ U.S. Government Documents department (http://library.columbia.edu/locations/usgd.html).

Student Team: Corina Bardoff, Mike Benowitz, Scarlett Taylor, Janelle Varin

Download Full Report: Columbia University Libraries Government Documents User Testing Report Spring 2015 (PDF)

Ingalls Library & Museum Archives Usability Study

ingallslibraryIn Spring 2015, a team of students from my Usability Theory & Practice course (LIS 644) at Pratt Institute conducted a usability study of the online catalog for the Ingalls Library and Museum Archives at the Cleveland Museum of Art (http://library.clevelandart.org/).

Student Team: Lisa Barrier, Erin Barsan, Greg Chaput, Alex Provo

Download Full Report: Ingalls Library User Testing Report Spring 2015 (PDF)

Archivists Round Table Usability Study

ARTIn Spring 2015, a team of students from my Usability Theory & Practice course (LIS 644) at Pratt Institute conducted a usability study of the website of the website of the Archivists Round Table (A.R.T.) of Metropolitan New York (http://www.nycarchivists.org/), one of the largest professional associations in North America for archivists, librarians, systems and records managers, and other individuals involved in preserving and making accessible cultural heritage information across all media and sectors.

Student Team: Maeve Countey, Kreya Jackson, Julie Schaeffer

Download Full Report: ART User Testing Report Spring 2015 (PDF)

The Grey Literature Report Usability Study

thegreyliteraturereportIn Spring 2015, a team of students from my Usability Theory & Practice course (LIS 644) at Pratt Institute conducted a usability study of the website for The Grey Literature Report (http://www.greylit.org/), a web resource for public health researchers to fill in the gaps of their peer-reviewed literature research with relevant grey literature.

Student Team: Allie Malinovskis, Rikki Pennisi, Andrew Ward

Download Full Report: The Grey Literature Report User Testing Report Spring 2015 (PDF)

CityTech Library Responsive Prototype Diary Study

citytechlibraryIn Spring 2015, a team of students from my Usability Theory & Practice course (LIS 644) at Pratt Institute conducted a diary usability study of a responsive prototype website for the Ursula C. Schwerin Library at New York City College of Technology (http://library.citytech.cuny.edu/).

Student Team: Mike Benowitz, Alex Provo, Julie Schaeffer

Download Full Report: City Tech Library Diary Study Report (PDF)

Social Movement Tracking Platform Diary Study

socialmovementtrackingplatformIn Spring 2015, two teams from my Usability Theory & Practice course (LIS 644) at Pratt Institute conducted a diary usability study of the beta version of a social movement tracking platform created by a local start-up.

Student Team #1: Lisa Barrier, Maeve Countey, Kreya Jackson, Rikki Pennisi
Student Team #2: Erin Barsan, Greg Chaput, Scarlett Taylor, Janelle Varin

Download Full Reports:
Social Movement Tracking Diary Study [Team 1] (PDF)
Social Movement Tracking Diary Study [Team 2] (PDF)

New Summer 2015 Course: Advanced User Experience Design

I’m excited to announce a new course I’ll be teaching this summer called “Advanced User Experience Design.” This course picks up from where LIS-643 Information Architecture and Interaction Design leaves off by going into greater depth about the core skills of UX design, including fundamentals of information and visual/communications design, advanced wireframing techniques and user journey mapping, and mobile/responsive design. The course will feature a blend of discussion, lectures, and hands-on projects, with the ultimate goal of giving students projects to include in their UX/IA portfolios.

Please note that this is an advanced topics course, which means it is only open to students who have completed LIS-643 or who have relevant background or experience in the area.

The full course description and a preliminary syllabus are available on my website at http://www.craigmacdonald.com/teaching-2/lis-646-advanced-ux-design/.

What: Advanced User Experience Design (LIS-697-02)
When: Mondays/Thursdays, 6:30-9:20p, May 28-July 16
Where: Room 609
Pre-requisites: LIS-643 (or permission of the instructor)

If you have any questions about this course, please contact me.

Columbia Digital Library Collections Cognitive Walkthrough Usability Evaluation

ColumbiaDLCIn Spring 2015, two students from my Usability Theory & Practice course (LIS 644) at Pratt Institute conducted separate cognitive walkthrough usability evaluations of a beta version of the Columbia Digital Library Collections interface (https://dlc.library.columbia.edu/).

Student #1: Mike Benowitz
Student #2: Andrew Ward

Download Full Reports:
Benowitz – Columbia DLC Cognitive Walkthrough Report (PDF)
Ward – Columbia DLC Cognitive Walkthrough Report (PDF)