Measuring and Detecting Emotions: Do We Really Know How You Feel?

Image Credit: MIT News

Think about the apps, websites, and other digital products that we encounter everyday. How do we feel when using them? Have we been pleased by some of them while annoyed by others? Are we aware of our reactions and behaviors when such feelings occur? Think of the times when we have the urge to abandon a website or uninstall an app out of frustration, and we will understand how much emotion weighs in those interactions.… Continue Reading »

Simulating Color Blindness for a More Accessible Interface

Choosing a good color scheme that follows best practices in design theory is a very important factor when creating a digital interface. It’s also important to design in ways that allow as many people as possible to access a product by taking into account the differing ways in which people perceive color.

What is color blindness?Continue Reading »

Do YouTube and Vimeo Meet WCAG 2.1 Keyboard Accessibility Guidelines?

Introduction

A screenshot of the WCAG 2.1 webpage.

The World Wide Web Consortium’s Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.1

 

In June 2018 the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) released the updated Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.1). The W3C is the main international standards organization for the World Wide Web that develops protocols and guidelines that ensure long-term growth for the Web.… Continue Reading »

WAVE: Web Accessibility Evaluation Tool

WAVE logo

 

WAVE Homepage

Figure 1.1: WAVE Web Accessibility Evaluation Tool webpage.

 

WAVE is an automated web accessibility evaluation tool developed by WebAIM.  WAVE can help developers, designers, and website users quickly evaluate the accessibility of web content after JavaScript and CSS has been applied. WAVE detects potential accessibility issues across a site as a whole, as well as highlight the areas where it does well. … Continue Reading »

Invisible Accessibility: Text Alternatives and Captions

Introduction

Computer-based devices are ubiquitous in our daily lives and most people interact with a computer interface with some regularity. But people are unique and people’s capabilities are different, and vision, hearing, and mobility disabilities are not uncommon. People with hearing and vision disabilities require alternatives for text and multimedia, and people with fine motor control disabilities need interfaces that respond to screen readers, voice commands, and other input methods.… Continue Reading »

Informed Consent and the Six Step Model

Data privacy is a real concern and often, our data isn’t secure. Giant corporations like Facebook and Equifax are in the news for breaching the privacy of millions. Social security numbers, home addresses but also page likes, and page views are hacked, sold or leaked. As more of our lives are spent on the internet, it’s important to consider what is consensual and what is crossing the line in digital design and research.… Continue Reading »

LEGO Serious Play in class

Use LEGO® Serious Play® in Design Research

When it comes to “LEGO”, what would you think of? Toy? Game? Or brick?

Today I want to talk about a more “serious” side of LEGO – the LEGO® Serious Play®. It’s not a game, it’s a methodology from LEGO which uses LEGO bricks to improve creative thinking and develop problem-solving skills. In UX field, many researchers start using it to conduct UX research.… Continue Reading »

UX Research Tool – Ethnio

User research has never been easy. Especially recruiting the right participants for a study is difficult. I remember the struggle I had recruiting participants to test my prototype several times. Life can be so much easier if someone or something can recruit the right participants for me. Ethnio is a tool for UX research which helps researchers do in-person interviews, online research, surveys and remote user testing.… Continue Reading »

Avoid misleading by quantitative responses on questionnaire: Traps in usability evaluation and the solutions

Introduction

Quantitative Usability was considered as a statistic way to evaluate system and service efficiency and usability. However, it’s easy to mislead by the quantitative feedback, like Darrell Huff’s “How to lie with statistics”(Huff, 2010), without validity benchmarks, quantitative usability methods are delicate and useless. I introduce both advantages and drawbacks in this article, emphasize the bias of quantitative usability data, and give the solution.Continue Reading »

It’s Written All Over Your Face! Or Is it? – Facial Response Analysis

Facial response analysis of the Mona Lisa

Facial Response Analysis has provided companies and researchers with a unique look into how exactly their users are feeling, allowing them to gather a large amount of data and provide a better user experience. However, this method may not always pick up on specific or unique emotional expressions, causing inaccuracy amongst evaluation.

 

     One element of great user experience design is a product that ignites positive emotions and engagement.Continue Reading »