Ideas & Issues


If you paid any attention to video game news in the past year, you will have no doubt heard volumes about the Star Wars Battlefront 2 Loot Box controversy. In essence, the publisher of the game, Electronic Arts, utilized a micro-transaction model in the game’s multiplayer. This was widely frowned upon due to exploitative way in which it was implemented.… Continue Reading »

Good Intentions ≠ Good Research: Identifying & combating cognitive bias in usability research

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Ignorance is not bliss

There’s an old saying you might have heard. It goes something like this: “fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me.” Usually, this is said after a series of betrayals by a friend, a family member, or a loved one. But could it reach into UX research as well?… Continue Reading »

Mind & Design


When designing products, there is a need to consider the psychology aspect of the user, since it has a direct connection to emotions. When a product isn’t design properly and creates difficulty for the user, it can lead to frustration and irritation, instead of providing a pleasurable experience.


In today’s world there is a challenge when it comes to modern designs to young adults with mental illnesses, since studies have shown that the level of stress is higher, resulting in a higher number of young adults suffering from anxiety, depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
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Aesthetic-Usability Effect

Homepage of 82nd & Fifth | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

What is the Aesthetic-Usability Effect?

There is a social psychology term called “the halo effect”. It means humans tend to assume that good-looking people have other positive qualities aside from their looks. The same rule applies to product or any other kinds of design. Good looking products and user interface are usually perceived as more valuable and having more qualities.Continue Reading »

Gestalt Psychology for UX Design



Understanding some basic psychological principles that impact visual perception is essential to user experience (UX) professionals interested in designing systems and products that better serve the needs of users. This post provides a brief overview of Gestalt psychology and demonstrates how many of its principles can help UX and interaction designers create interfaces that intentionally direct the user’s attention to the functions and features that are most useful.Continue Reading »

Journey Map: A Tool to Approach Customer Experience

The companies that focus on maximizing satisfaction, with regard to the entire customer journey, are more likely to increase customer satisfaction, loyalty and advocacy among their customers than companies that focus on parts of the business in a segmented way. In order to improve customer satisfaction, focus should be on the whole customer experience. Customers value the ability to be in constant and effective contact with a company through multiple avenues at the same time.… Continue Reading »

Storytelling in UX


Everyone loves a good story, it’s how we connect and communicate with one another. Storytelling in user experience is no different. The benefits are more than just communicating and connecting with your audience – by approaching UX through the lens of a storyteller, one can significantly strengthen both the presentation as well as their own understanding of research and findings.
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Retailers Utilize Physical Constraints to Influence Shopping


The National Retail Federation expects 2017 holiday retail sales[1] to total $678 billion, an increase of about 3.6 percent from last year. According to Deloitte, consumers are expected to spend 42% of their holiday budgets in brick and mortar stores. In order to maximize profits, stores employ usability principles to manipulate customers into purchasing more merchandise.… Continue Reading »

Visual Lies: Usability in Deceptive Data Visualizations

Designers can utilize usability principles to create products that may greatly enhance our everyday lives. From smart phone apps to non-Norman Doors, the application of usability principles has given us wonderful tools, games, and digital interfaces. But what about the dark, deceptive uses of these principles?

In a previous post, I explored ways in which online notices for terms and conditions are often designed in ways to be deceptive to internet users (that post can be found by clicking here).… Continue Reading »