Bring Gestalt Psychology into Design Playground

User Experience design is all about understanding users. In order to be a good UX designer or interaction designer, we have to know that we are not solving our own problems, but users. With Gestalt psychological rules and theories, we can add more value to our products by better understanding users’ behaviors, emotions, and motivations. Using Gestalt principles can not only help the designers create fantastic products, but also assist you to convince your boss, customers, and engineers to say YES!… Continue Reading »

Reducing cognitive overload to Increase usability in online sale

Talking about Amazon, my friends and I all have bad experiences before. We give up selecting a specific product because of thousands of options on Amazon with all kinds of feedback evaluation, and finally, go to Ikea or Target grab one. What’s wrong with Amazon? It gives us choices as more as they can, but why doesn’t it make Amazon competitive?… Continue Reading »

Good Robot, Bad Robot: The Ethics of AI

Link to blog: http://ixd.prattsi.org/2018/10/good-robot-bad-robot-the-ethics-of-ai/

 

Still from silent era film classic “Metropolis”

Introduction: The ethically-minded have always weighed benefit and risk when it comes to AI becoming more prevalent in everyday life. The topic has been picked apart in everything from pulpy sci-fi novels from the 50s to well-regarded popular scientific journals of today, where ever-increasing human-like AI are now commonplace.… Continue Reading »

Strategies and Good Examples of Multiscreen UX

In last blog post, I talked about some basic principles to follow when designing for multi-screens. There is 3Cs Framework (Consistent, Continuous, Complementary) I found extremely helpful when analyzing the strategies of multiscreen design.

However, there are more specific strategies could be discussed which I believe can also fit into the 3Cs Framework. The book Multiscreen UX Design provides 17 strategies of multiscreen UX, and I tried to categorize them into the 3Cs Framework:

  • Consistent

    • Mobile First: Concentrate on the smallest device first, which forces a meaningful structure of information
    • Coherence: Individual features are optimized for device capabilities
    • Fluidity: The display is switched between the screens involved
  • Continuous

    • Device shifting: The display of information or content is shifted to a separate device by the user
    • Synchronization: Information is kept in sync and up-to-date across devices.
Continue Reading »

Principles of Designing for Multi-screens

Today, human live with screens, and most likely, with multi-screens. There are PCs, smartphone, tablets, TVs, smartwatches and more. People use them for different occasions or use them together. As a designer, I heard about terms like “mobile-first” and “responsive” a lot and have actually designed products across different platforms, while I found there is still a gap and struggle of designing for multi-screens.… Continue Reading »

Web Accessibility Research on Museum Websites

I interned at Guggenheim Museum interactive department in 2017 summer. During the internship period, one of my research topic was alt text and hyperlink best practices on museum websites.

According to Wikipedia, web accessibility refers to “the inclusive practice of removing barriers that prevent interaction with, or access to websites, by people with disabilities.” When sites are correctly designed, developed and edited, all users are supposed to have equal access to information and functionality.… Continue Reading »

Issues Evident in Contemporary Internet & Social Media Research

This blog is part of the series Usability in the Real World: Ethics in Usability Research

Abstract: While there are many cases for a ‘unified code’, the information science and technology industry hardly has centralized ethics codes. There are two, significant explanations that intend to offer the possibilities for the absence of the so-called ‘unified code’.Continue Reading »

Honesty in Ethical User Testing

Learning how to conduct respectable, ethical research is crucial skill for any aspiring usability expert. Ethics, defined by D. Resnik at the National Institute of Environmental Health Science, is “norms for conduct that distinguish between acceptable and unacceptable behavior. The foundation for clean ethical research are the principles of honesty and integrity”[1]. The UXPA Code of Conduct for User Experience Professionals states, “be honest with everyone, act with Integrity, do no harm and if possible provide benefits,.”[2] These principles should not only be applied to usability participants, but should also extend to the clients as well.Continue Reading »

Can Universal Accessibility Improve Usability for All?

 

Image from accesibilidadweb.com

Usability and Accessibility had similarities and differences. However, when focusing on improving websites for those with specific needs it ultimately helps everyone. Unfortunately, most Usability Evaluations focus on the “average user” as the target use but when a user with a disability becomes the target user Usability will be improved for all.… Continue Reading »